Monmouth Mile Recap

Let’s start off by saying, I’m really excited about what this race told me about my fitness and the way I’m capable of handling training and racing.  That’s what I’m super happy about.  The rest of it – how I feel a day after the race, how I handled the race, and the outcome – are still a work in progress, but that’s what distance running is all about.  Taking baby steps forward and minimizing the setbacks.

I’m doing really well these days of taking big steps forward with only tiny steps back.

A quick rundown of how the night played out and what I learned from each situation…

Marc winning his mile race at the Monmouth Meet

Marc winning his mile race at the Monmouth Meet


Pre Race

What I wanted to do:

  • I was hoping for a great 3 mile warm up.
  • Get in good, hard strides.
  • Do lots of drills to be loose and ready.

What I actually did:

My biggest negative that I can turn into a positive is this: Know the order of events and roughly when I’ll race.

I made the big mistake of assuming that I’d race at around 7 pm or later.  I got to the Monmouth facility at 6 (after a 2 hour car ride), only to find out that our race would go off at 6:30.  Uh oh!

We quickly got into a slow jog and got a short mile and a half jog in before I spiked up and got in a few drills and strides.

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Race

What I wanted to do: 

Coach Marc racing a mile on an indoor track

Coach Marc racing a mile on an indoor track

  • Run even splits of 68 seconds per 400 and close well at the end.
  • Follow the leaders and tuck in behind them.
  • Remember what it feels like to run fast.

What I actually did:

I got off the line really well. So well, that I found myself in first place.  I wasn’t about to slow down and let someone go by me just for the hell of it, so I maintained my front running status.  My first 400 was 63.  Great. That’ll hurt later.

After 800 meters in 2:16 and 1k in 2:48, I still felt good and in control of the race.  Moving into the last 400 meters, my friend Chris passes me.  I instantly feel tired, heavy and sorry for myself.  The gap between us grows and grows.

With 200 to go, I feel him slowing down and losing control of the space he’s created between him and I.  With 150 to go, I come up on his shoulder and pass him, pulling away for the victory.

Being in the first heat (and fastest heat), it was unlikely that anyone would match my time.  

Results will be here when they’re up.

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Post-Race

What I wanted to do:

I had plans of doing more work at a faster pace – whether it was a fartlek or repeats – it didn’t matter.  I opted to put on training shoes, jog for 10 minutes and then pace a slower section.  I encouraged the runners to stay behind me as I’d run exactly 5 minute pace.

What I actually did:

Took the lead for the first 50 meters until a sprightly high schooler sped past me.  Upon his departure of my wind breaking, 3 other runners passed me.  I no longer was in the lead, yet still running faster than their prescribed pace.  

At 500 meters, my left calf started grabbing at me and at 600 meters, I walked off the track.

If the runners weren’t willing to run a smart (and even) race, why would I continue to put myself in pain and pace them?

After this, I stretched and massaged for a few minutes before an easy 25 minute cool down jog.


Thoughts about the day

This was a really good experience. I learned a lot about what training I’ve done and where it puts me in terms of how I move forward.

I learned that I need to check into when my race is, especially for track meets.

I remembered how to race, how to “suffer” and that I absolutely love to compete.
What is it about racing that makes running so awesome?

More stories about Coach Marc racing? Coming right up!

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