Sore Muscles After Hard Workouts

Recover from Hard Running

It’s time to recover from that hard run you just did! Whether you’re recovering from a long run or a hard workout, you’ll want to implement the best strategies to get you back out the door for your next hard day!  The goal, as always, is to minimize the DOMS – delayed onset of muscle soreness – that you’re likely going to feel.

Below are some superb ways we can help our sore muscles and get some much-needed relief so we can get back out there and do it all over again!  You’d be surprised at how much benefit you can derive from implementing the strategies and tools I have below. In the comments, and on social, tell me what you do to recover and also what tips you’re going to implement now that you read this. Enjoy! recover from a really hard workout or race Continue reading

Shin Splints

Dealing with Shin Splints

Oh no! Shin splints again? What to do, what to do? Don’t let the term shin splints scare you into not running. Yes, they hurt and they can lead to worse issues with your shins [stress fractures, but only if you don’t treat the shin pains], but you can totally run with sore shins without making them worse. Continue reading

Break in Running Shoes

Breaking in New Running Shoes

Shoe brands do a great job of providing running shoes that are good to wear right out of the box. We had this old misperception that running shoes needed days to be “broken in” before we could go for a run in them. Times have changed. Shoes are ready to go once you take them out of the box and put ‘em on your feet!

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Continue reading

Race Day Running Routine

Optimizing Your Racing Potential

Racing to your optimal performance level is complicated because there are so many factors that go into performing at a high level. A lot goes into running fast. It’s so much more than being physically prepared. I know a lot of runners who are in peak fitness shape and yet cannot perform to the level they’d hoped to have achieved. Why is that? Well, there are. Continue reading

Smart Running Tips

Running Tips for the Smart Runners

Shalane Flanagan recently said, “You can’t take a Ferrari off-roading”… as she announces that she’s injured and pulling out of the Boston Marathon this April.

This Ferrari analogy is so true as so many distance runners find themselves taking their race car bodies into uncharted and unfamiliar territories without pause or hesitation. Continue reading

Planning a Racing Season

Planning a Racing Season

Winter time is here.  I hate running in the winter.  I don’t enjoy being cold. Ever.  Luckily, planning a racing calendar is something that motivates me to get out the door when it’s really cold, windy and truthfully, I’d rather be doing anything besides running outside.

Planning a Racing Season

Planning a Racing Season

When I’m building a race calendar, a lot of factors go into my decision.  I often ask myself if the race is “worth” my time. Let’s break that down, as that phrase “worth it” is not intended to be elitist in any sense.

  • Is the race helping me reach a goal?
  • Does it fit into my life calendar?
  • Is the price fair for the race distance/experience I’ll have?

After thinking about those questions, I look at whether the pros outweigh the cons.  Even if a race passes the above tests, that doesn’t necessarily mean I’ll race it.  Then I ask myself these questions:

  • Am I in shape or out of shape?  
  • Do I feel like racing?
  • Do I need to race for motivation or for another reason?

As you can see, I don’t just race to race.  There are a lot of factors that go into deciding to race… Sometimes, I’ll go 4-5 months without racing.  Why? There isn’t a need to or a race that satisfies all of my above qualifications!

Ok, so let’s say I’ve chosen a racing calendar.  It has 4-5 races spread out throughout 3-4+ months.  I’ve adjusted my training to focus specifically on the goal race and I work backward.  What do I need to do in training to be at my best for the goal race?  I focus on just the goal race as the other races are less important.  They are crucial for me to do them, but not in the sense that I am looking to run a PR or a perfect race.  In these non-peak races, I’m purely looking to work on strategies such as pacing, nutrition, and getting rid of nerves.  That’s all they are there for!

Planning your next racing season

When to race & when to keep training


When to back off even if I have a scheduled race on the calendar.

Numerous times to “skip” (ie. NOT RACE) even though a race is on my calendar:

  • If an injury occurs during training
  • If I don’t feel recovered from training or a race
  • If my goal race has changed
  • If something in my non-running life has come up

So many reasons to NOT race… Be picky.  Be choosy.  Figure out what’s important to you and why you’re always racing.  Just know that you’re not going to get everything out of yourself if you race week in and week out over the course of 5 months.  There’s little time to train effectively when each weekend there is a race.  Good blocks of uninterrupted training will ultimately be the most rewarding and the best strategy to performing well in a select few race.

Reasons Not to Race

Reasons Not to Race


Interested in more that’s similar to this?

Distance runners should keep a training log

Having a race-day checklist 

Using a coach to guide your training

Setting goals for a racing season

 

Contacting Marc

Contacting Marc

Strength Training and Base Mileage

Over the last month, I’ve done more strength training than I had previously done in the last 6 months.  

True story.  

I tell my runners to keep up with their strength training (bodyweight exercises, ie: pushups, squats, lunges, etc, core and ab work, hip and mobility, etc, etc… Yet, hardly ever “found time” to do it myself.  There is a disconnect between my runner-self (doing strength work) and the coach (telling myself to do strength work).  I know how valuable it is for me to do it, yet couldn’t pull myself together to actually do it with any kind of regularity.  I choose an easy run over 20 minutes of strength.  Blah! That needs to change.

Base Mileage & Strength Training

Base Mileage & Strength Training

Strength training is something I’ve needed to incorporate into my weekly routine, but never really had any desires to figure out how and when I’d make it work.  Not only does strength work improve my running form, my running economy, and my overall ability to run faster, but it is also something I need to continue doing as I get into my mid-30’s.  

This lack of effort, or, better put, lack of stringing together days and weeks of strength training has recently changed.  I’ve been able to do my strength training with a group – and that has helped tremendously.  I get my 3-4 mile run in, then head indoors to work out with the kids I’m coaching.  

all-i-needed-was-some-accountability-and-a-reason-to-stay-consistentIt doesn’t matter one bit who I’m doing my strength with.  What matters is that I’m actually getting it done.  

Prone Stabilizer - Core Exercise # 2

Prone Stabilizer – Core Exercise # 2

As it stands now, it looks like all I needed was some accountability and a reason to stay consistent.  Maybe that’s all it takes for anything to get done?

Strength training and base mileage for distance runners

Strength training while adding base mileage for distance runners


Here are some of the routines I’ve done. If you do any, snap a pic and tag it with #TrainwithMarc.

UK Workout

8 Min Abs 

Shoe Workout

Deck of Cards Workout

Body Weight Strength Routine

Power & Explosive moves

Contacting Marc

Contacting Marc

Question about any of the exercises? Google is your best friend.

7 ways to go from a good runner to a great one

I have been getting brand new runners lately and I thought that even us seasoned vets could use some reminding about what it takes to go from a good runner to a great runner.

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7 ways to go from a good runner to a great one


 

1.  When in doubt, something is better than nothing. Go get a mile in.  Chances are, it won’t be as bad as you think it is and you’ll continue on for a few miles.

2.  Slow down – it’s better to move (by move I mean run, cross train, basically sweat) for 40 minutes at a slower pace than 25 minutes at a faster pace.  When you work out slower, you’re able to recover for your next workout.  When you’re recovered and not sore from a hard workout, you’re more likely to get out there for that next run.
3.  If you don’t run every day, move around days only if you have to.  There is a pattern and a flow to how your workouts should be arranged.  Become a planner.  Know you have a run/workout scheduled and plan to get it in.  Try not to stack hard days next to each other without some planned rest before and after.  As you become more seasoned, you can get away with this, but as a new runner, you’ll want to go in an easy-hard-easy pattern.
4.  If you’ve taken a complete off day and should have worked out, then you should attempt to make it up.  Know that stacking back to back (to back) days is what gets you injured, and so we try to avoid this scenario.  Don’t save your off days for early or late in the week.

5. As runners, we have to be flexible with our training.  That means that if Tuesday looks better than Wednesday (weather, scheduling, life-wise), we should probably try and do our hard workout that day.  It doesn’t mean let’s put off our workouts to Friday and Saturday because we didn’t have time.

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Going from good to GREAT!

6. Distance runners aim to build a big base (run as much as possible without getting hurt) so that when you start doing workouts and faster paced runs, you have the foundation to build upon.  Think of building a skyscraper with a weak foundation…what is likely to happen?  It will tip over or crumble (you’ll be more susceptible to injury).  So we aim to have a good foundation of easy runs and long runs to help support the faster workouts that are to come later in the training cycle.
7. Our bodies can adapt to a great amount of stress if we let it.  We should aim to only increase one of three training variables at a time.  When we stress more than one factor, we are more susceptible to injuries.  However, we can trick our bodies into thinking we are just playing with one variable, when we can be altering two.  The important key is to stay hydrated, get enough sleep and eat healthily.  The 3 variables are intensity, density and volume.
Intensity – how fast our percieved effort is for a given run
Density – how soon you allow yourself to recover between your workouts.
Volume – how much mileage are you running per day? per week? per month?

Be sure to share this with new runners – it’s great advice that I’ve picked up on over the years!

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3rd TrainwithMarc logo

For details on how you can train, run, and race with TrainWithMarc, find us on the web:

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